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Quincy Office
(617) 773-5070

Marshfield Office
(781) 837-5070

What's Going Around?

Allergies

Seasonal allergies, or hayfever, are very common at this time of year. Typical symptoms include watery, itchy, red eyes; a clear runny nose; sneezing; and an itchy palate or throat. The most common triggers are trees in the spring, grasses in the summer, and weeds in the fall!

Effective non-sedating medications are now available for children over the age of 2 without a prescription for treatment of seasonal allergies. These include loratadine (generic Claritin), Claritin, and Zyrtec. These medications can be given as needed for allergy symptoms. If you think your child has seasonal allergies and he or she is not responding to medication OR if you are not sure, please make an appointment in our office.

Many children do not require allergy testing if they respond to treatment with medication as needed.

For more information: See also Eye - Allergy


Hand-Foot-Mouth Disease

Hand-foot-mouth disease is a common viral illness caused by the Coxsackie A-16 virus (a member of the enterovirus family). Its name describes the location of the rash during the illness.
Typically children experience fever and small blisters in the mouth in the first few days followed by small blisters on the hands and then feet. Sometimes the rash is seen in the diaper area as well. The mouth blisters can be painful. Ibuprofen or acetaminophen can be given as needed for pain relief. It is important to make sure your child receives plenty of fluids. Cold liquids may provide pain relief as well.

Call our office for an appointment if you think your child may be showing symptoms of dehydration during this illness (urinating less than every 8 hours, dry mouth, or lethargy); if the fever persists after the first 3-4 days; or if you cannot keep the pain under control.

For more information: See also Mouth Ulcers , See also Rash or Redness - Widespread


Mouth Blisters (Herpangina)

Herpangina is an illness caused by a virus, with small blister-like bumps or ulcers in the back of throat or the roof of the mouth. The child may have a high fever with the illness.

Herpangina is a common disease in children and is usually seen in children between the ages of 1 and 4, most often in the summer and fall. Good handwashing is necessary to help prevent the spread of the disease.

Treatment for herpangina is to help decrease the severity of the symptoms. Since it is a viral infection, antibiotics are ineffective. Treatment may include increased fluid intake, and acetaminophen for fever and pain.

If the child is not taking fluids well and there is concern about hydration, you should bring the child in to the office.


Pink Eye

We are currently seeing children and adolescents with "pink eye." Also known as conjunctivitis, this condition can be caused by either a viral or bacterial infection. Viral pink eye typically appears as red and watery eyes, and is accompanied by common viral cold or upper respiratory symptoms. This type of pink eye should resolve itself as the viral cold improves. Bacterial pink eye usually appears as red eyes with yellow or green discharge. Upon awakening, the eyes often are matted shut with dried discharge. This type of pink eye also may be associated with a viral cold, but the bacterial eye infection itself requires antibiotic eye drops to cure. Good handwashing is very important because both viral and bacterial pink eye infections are very contagious.

For more information: See also Eye - Pus or Discharge


Strep Throat

We are currently seeing quite a bit of strep throat. If your child has a fever, sore throat, headache, or stomachache without any other viral symptoms like congestion or cough, it may be strep throat. Bacteria, called Group A strep, cause this type of sore throat. To diagnose strep throat, your physician will require a swab of your child's throat, and antibiotics will be needed if the strep test is positive.

For more information: See also Sore Throat , See also Strep Throat Exposure


Vomiting and Diarrhea

We are currently seeing viral illnesses that cause vomiting and diarrhea. Usually called viral gastroenteritis, the virus causes inflammation and irritation of the stomach and the intestines, leading to vomiting and diarrhea. This illness, often called the "stomach flu" typically lasts 1-2 days, with diarrhea lasting a few days longer.

It is important to make sure that your child does not get dehydrated with this condition. Offer Gatorade, Pedialyte, or warm soda pop in small amounts every 20 minutes until your child can keep liquids down. If they are unable to keep liquids down, back off for 2 hours, then try the small amounts again. If your child has few wet diapers and does not make tears, or appears limp or lethargic, they may be dehydrated and we will need to see them in our office.

For more information: See also Diarrhea , See also Vomiting Without Diarrhea

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News @ QPA

  • Schedule your Child's Annual Physical or Sports Exam TODAY

    Summer months are a busy time for back-to-school and sports physicals.  We have our summer schedules and we are scheduling appointments!  Call today to schedule your child's Annual physical! 
     
  • Good Luck, Dr. P!

    We congratulate Dr. Andy Pryharski on his retirement from Quincy Pediatrics at the end of June.

    Dr. P joined the practice in July, 1972 along with Drs. Kuperstein, Zonis, and Russell Irons. He has worked tirelessly for our practice and patient families for the past 46 years, and we wish him luck as he and Wendy enjoy their children and grandchildren as well as the beaches of Maine and the Cape!

    We will miss his companionship and say goodbye with his famous quote for us at the end of each day—"Hope they’re good to Ya, Andy!"

     
  • QUINCY PEDS WELCOMES NEW PROVIDER!!!

    QPA is pleased to welcome a new provider in July, 2018.    Cherie Irons, FNP will be joining Quincy Pediatrics as our newest provider!!    She will be available to see patients in both our Quincy and Marshfield locations and is accepting new patients.  She brings years of experience working as a Nurse Practitioner in both Family Practice and Pediatrics.   We are confident she will be wonderful addition to Quincy Pediatrics Associates.

    Her personal interests include physical fitness, reading, cooking, and music.  She resides in Hanover with her husband, Dr. David Irons, three children, and two dogs.