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Growth & Development



Bright Futures Patient Handout: 9 and 10 Year Visits

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School

Doing Well at School

  • Try your best at school. It's important to how you feel about yourself.

  • Ask for help when you need it.

  • Join clubs and teams, church groups, and friends for activities after school.

  • Tell kids who pick on you or try to hurt you to stop bothering you. Then walk away.

  • Tell adults you trust about bullies.

Safety

Playing It Safe

  • Wear your seat belt at all times in the car.

    Use a booster seat if the seat belt does not fit you yet.

  • Sit in the back seat until you are 13. It is the safest place.

  • Wear your helmet for biking, skating, and skateboarding.

  • Always wear the right safety equipment for your activities.

  • Never swim alone.

  • Use sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher when out in the sun.

  • Have friends over only when your parents say it's OK.

  • Ask to go home if you are uncomfortable with things at someone else's house or a party.

  • Avoid being with kids who suggest risky or harmful things to do.

  • Know that no older child or adult has the right to ask to see or touch your private parts, or to scare you.

Nutrition and Physical Activity

Eating Well, Being Active

  • Eat breakfast every day. It helps learning.

  • Aim for eating 5 fruits and vegetables every day.

  • Drink 3 cups of low-fat milk or water instead of soda pop or juice drinks.

  • Limit high-fat foods and drinks such as candies, snacks, fast food, and soft drinks.

  • Eat with your family often.

  • Talk with a doctor or nurse about plans for weight loss or using supplements.

  • Plan and get at least 1 hour of active exercise every day.

  • Limit TV and computer time to 2 hours a day.

Oral Health

Healthy Teeth

  • Brush your teeth at least twice each day, morning and night.

  • Floss your teeth every day.

  • Wear your mouth guard when playing sports.

Development and Mental Health

Growing and Developing

  • Ask a parent or trusted adult questions about changes in your body.

  • Talking is a good way to handle anger, disappointment, worry, and feeling sad.

  • Everyone gets angry.

    • Stay calm.

    • Listen and talk through it.

    • Try to understand the other person's point of view.

  • Don't stay friends with kids who ask you to do scary or harmful things.

  • It's OK to have up-and-down moods, but if you feel sad most of the time, talk to us.

  • Know why you say “No!” to drugs, alcohol, tobacco, and sex.

© 2010 American Academy of Pediatrics

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  • Remembering Dr. Russell Irons

    To All our Quincy Pediatrics Families, Friends, Patients and Colleagues,
    It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Dr. Russell Irons, January 3, 1927-July 28, 2019.  Dr. Russell Irons touched the lives of so many people as a beloved physician, father, grandfather, friend, and colleague.  Dr. Irons started Quincy Pediatrics in 1971 and provided exceptional care to his patients for over forty-five years.   Dr. Irons will be remembered for his compassion, sharp intellect, contagious laugh, and love for his family, friends, colleagues, patients, and Becket/Chimney Corners family.   The love and gratitude we all feel for him cannot be expressed in words.   The legacy of Dr. Russell Irons will live on in the hearts of all who knew and loved him.