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Child Behavior

ASDs Family Handout - School-based Services

Schools can provide extra help to students who are struggling with the regular curriculum in several ways, even if a child does not have a diagnosed disability. The teacher in a regular classroom can informally try different teaching approaches than the one used for the rest of the class. The classroom teacher can consult with other teachers and provide individual attention or other teaching strategies without having to have a child get additional testing. This first level of extra help is called response to intervention (RTI). If a child needs more help than can be provided by the classroom team, a committee on special education (CSE) might advise using school-supported resources according to a plan. This type of agreed-on intervention is called a Section 504 plan after the federal law that describes it. If a child needs to have formal testing to establish learning and language diagnoses and needs modification to curriculum, the CSE may recommend a formal Individualized Education Program (IEP). The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Grants to States Program Part B gives local schools funding for students aged 3 to 21 years with disabilities who qualify for IEPs.

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Additional Resources

The 1-2-3 Magic Program continues to offer parents, pediatricians, mental health professionals, grandparents, teachers and even babysitters a simple and gentle-but-firm approach to managing the behavior of 2 to 12-year-olds, whether they are average kids or special-needs children.
Think:Kids at Massachusetts General Hospital. Under the Direction of Dr. Stuart Ablon, Think:Kids teaches Collaborative Problem Solving, a revolutionary, evidence-based approach for helping children with behavioral challenges.

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